We will publish letters and comments on this site.  They will rotate often as we believe actual letters and case reports are an excellent resource for arachnoiditis patients to improve their care.  Send your letter to “Arachnoiditis Research and Education Project“.

You may send your questions to veractinc@msn.com , fax to 626-919-7497, or mail to:

The Tennant Foundation

Arachnoiditis Research and Education Project

334 S. Glendora Ave.

West Covina, CA 91790-3043

 

Dr. Tennant, I’ll keep this brief. Do all steroids that have gone into the CSF cause Arachnoiditis? I had epidural steroids (kenalog) for L1/2/3-disc degeneration. The procedure went wrong, and I ended up with full spinal block, I am now 7 weeks post-op and have been very unwell with lots of symptoms. Does this mean I will definitely develop AA? I am so desperate and need some advice Thank you in advance, LF

ANSWER

Dear LF,

We recommend that any person who has symptoms after an epidural or spinal tap take the emergency treatment. The specifics are shown in our handbook.

You should have no symptoms after 7 weeks post procedure. In particular we recommend a 6-day Medrol® Dose Pack and 2-3 daily injections of ketorolac. You can’t hurt yourself and you can almost always prevent arachnoiditis.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Thank you, Dr. Tennant,

I am going to attempt to call all of the doctors in my area in hopes I can find at least one that has enough knowledge on Arachnoiditis in hopes they can help me with this.  In the meantime, I will do my best doing the non-pharmaceutical approach to the treatment protocol.  I do have a question about the latest handbook.  I see you have colostrum listed in the section for neuroregenerative agents to help assist the growth of damaged nerves.  So, colostrum passes the blood brain barrier?  Does it really matter what brand or kind?

DV

ANSWER

Dear DV,

As of yet I don’t have enough information and experience with colostrum to be very specific about brands.  It is a natural substance so it should cross the blood brain barrier.

My best experiences are limited but instructive.  I am personally aware of a few severe EDS and AA patients who have taken colostrum for some time and have done remarkably well.  In fact, in some cases they should have ordinarily died or become bed-bound when they have, instead, thrived quite well.  Let me know about any personal or related experiences that we can pass on.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant 

Dear Dr. Tennant,

Thank you for so quick a reply! This is a very interesting read. Lots of things I have been doing intuitive, like soaking a lot, stretching, walking, eating Pregnenolone (not enough)…

I also experience relief with everything that deepens my breath, like exhausting gym, cycling and singing!

I was reading at some other place that many AA-sufferers also have Colitis (Crohn´s or ulcerative). I myself am suffering of lymphocytic colitis (which was long mistaken for irritable bowl) and experience worsening of backpain and stiffness when I eat food, which my bowl does not like. With a pretty restrictive diet (no grains except oats and rice, no oil seeds, no salads, best only cooked vegetables, raw fruit are alright), I can control the colitis and the backpain pretty well. When fasting for several days, I will nearly feel healed until I start eating again… (I seem to tolerate milk without problems and do not need to watch my weight, BMI being19.5).

Thanks again and have a pleasant Sunday!

MR

ANSWER

Dear MR,

AA routinely causes some stomach and intestine problems.  The major reason is that some of the nerves that control the stomach and intestine may get entrapped in the adhesions of the disease.  AA can also cause centralized pain and an autoimmune disorder that can lead to the very problem you describe.  You have found a remedy and solution that other AA patients should know about.  Thanks for sharing.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Hello Dr. Tennant,

I’m happy to report I’m doing very well. The symptoms I reported to you a few months ago have almost completely cleared up, except I still have diffuse twitching all over my body, especially in my feet and some mild tightness in my back that comes and goes. It is easily controlled with tizanidine. I’m not in any pain and have no trouble moving or any neurological deficits. Surprisingly, the mild headaches and pain in my groin area disappeared a couple weeks before I saw my pain management doctor. Even with the two-week absence of pain and headaches, the doctor prescribed me 1.5mg LDN (three times daily, total 4.5mg) and 2mg methylprednisolone (once daily). I also tolerate robust physical therapy, including lumbar traction and electrical stimulation needles in the lumbar without any pain. I haven’t been in any pain since I first corresponded with you (mid-January) and before pain mgt and physical therapy. I work a full-time job as well.

Given my excellent condition, lack of possible early ARC progression and mild enhancement of my MRI images, I want to know your thoughts on my long-term prognosis.

Additionally, I have asked my doctor about prescribing me pentoxifylline as part of your protocol to dissolve early clumping. My doctor is very eager to experiment but asked me to get an explanation from you on how it will work and its efficacy. My doctor said it might be contraindicated because it increases blood flow which could increase swelling in the cord. If not pentoxifylline, would you recommend anything else from your protocol? Perhaps a neuro-regenerative agent such as oxytocin? I do not require any pain relief agents. Lastly, do you think I could take all 4.5mg of the LDN in one dose? It would be cheaper to get them compounded in that dosage vs 1.5mg.

Thank you, T 

ANSWER

Dear T,

I’m delighted to hear your progress.  If 4.5 mg of LDN doesn’t upset you, a single dose is fine.  Your long-term prognosis is excellent.  You have probably prevented the development of full-blown AA.  Although pentoxifylline might help, I believe some of the natural hormones and anti-neuroinflammatory agents taken on 3 to 5 days a week are options.  For example, curcumin or serrapeptase are excellent anti-neuroinflammatory agents.  DHEA (200 mg) or pregnenolone (100 mg) on 5 days a week would be good natural hormones for neuroregeneration.

Lastly, at this stage all you may need are physiologic measures such as a walk-a-day.

Keep us posted.  You are a good example of what I want all of medical practice to know.  “If you develop headache, burning pain, foot pain, twitching, jerking, or bladder difficulties, start AA treatment to prevent its full-blown development”.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Hello Dr. Tennant,

I’ve been getting unbearable pain from cars passing. It is upsetting and brings the pain to ridiculous levels.  I can’t find anything about it online.  I don’t think doctors understand when I tell them.  They dug up the sidewalk outside my house, and it was a 15-hour pain flare.  The next day any vibration is intolerable.  What can calm that down?  I got so depressed from the pain and when a car passes and puts me in more pain.  I’m on a Medrol pack now but after yesterday it may have well stopped working.  My back is so irritated.

Thank you, R

ANSWER

Dear R,

You well describe the problem of vibrations triggering pain in AA.  This is a bigger problem than generally recognized.

First, I believe that AA patients who are sensitive to vibrations have retained electricity and considerable nerve damage.  I recommend you use magnets and copper daily.  Wearing a copper bracelet or anklet may help.

You will need to find a medical agent that will reduce vibration sensitivity.  One natural, herbal remedy is Valerian Root.  Prescription agents to try are: gabapentin, tizanidine, clonidine, Valium®, Soma®, Vistaril®.

If you find a remedy, let me know and I will share it.

Also, you mention that pain has returned as you are into the latter period of the 6-day treatment. This tells me you need to be on methylprednisolone, 2 to 4 mg, on 3 to 5 days a week.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dr Tennant,

Thank you for the advice on the brace. It does help. Can I ask another question?

The Dr I’m seeing is setting me up for a trial/testing for a spinal cord stimulator. What are your thoughts on this?

P

ANSWER

Dear P,

I only recommend a spinal cord stimulator in patients who have a full treatment program of medication and physiologic measures.  The medication program must contain drugs from these 3 categories: anti-neuroinflammatory, neuroregenesis, and pain control.  Once on a comprehensive program, then give a stimulator a trial.  Remember: a stimulator can only give you short-term, symptomatic relief.  It does not treat your underlying problems which could last a life-time. Put another way. A stimulator should only be considered an adjunct or addition to a comprehensive medical program.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dear Dr. Tennant,

Any thought on hydration? I drink over 100 oz. a day. I use the hydrate bottle system and my profile dictates that amount.  My diet is quite consistent with the diet outlined in the report given in this email.

Thank you, PJ

ANSWER

Dear PJ,

Thanks for your experience with hydration. It is probably an overlooked aspect of proper therapeutics. Why? Any disease with the term “it is” means inflammation. One of the damaging aspects of inflammation is the shedding of toxic tissue waste into the spinal fluid, blood, and lymph. Good hydration rapidly eliminates this toxic waste and allows healing and pain relief to take place.

Thanks, Forest Tennant

Hi Dr. Tennant,

I am still taking my hormones daily and I was wondering what you would recommend for the continuous electrical current that I have down my left leg. It gets so bad that I’m nauseated from the pain.  My surgeon has me on Percocet 5/325mg three times a day but that doesn’t even touch it.  I had L1 thru L4 fused on 9/20/18 that gave me Arachnoiditis by dropping bone fragments down my spinal column.  Will I ever be able to get rid of the electrical current pain?

Thank you, DA

ANSWER

Dear D,

Electrical currents and jerking movement occur in many AA patients.  There isn’t any one agent that will stop them. You need to rub your leg with a magnet at least a couple of times a day. A copper ankle or shoe insert may help.

I’m collecting reports on agents that some AA patients found helpful.  I have received positive reports for: 1. hydroxyzine; 2. ketamine; 3. carisoprodol (Soma); 4. tizanidine.  I believe you will have to sequentially try different agents to find one that works for you.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dear Dr. Tennant! 

I found out about binaural therapy by accident.

I was suffering some incredibly weird sensations, so I decided to google nerve regeneration symptoms and bingo.    I can only state my truth to you. There is something of a far greater power going on, when a patient learns to relax, accept, and understand that the awful burning tingling……. is nerve regeneration. Binaural beats approx.. 100hz via headphones is ELECTRIFYING.

Thunder and lightning, binaural beats and electrical discharge to earth. All, though frighteningly painful symptoms, once understood by a patient to be curative,……..your patient is hooked on a free pain relief service.

I add that to your protocols and I am thriving, not just surviving!

The idiots here refuse to accept a separate diagnosis of ELHERS DANLOS syndrome.

Not one will assist me with administrative use of your anabolic therapy.

I truly feel, because I dare to question and refuse to be drugged to point of total dependence and compliance, that I am being stone walled at every opportunity!

I do hope others will benefit from simple YouTube binaural beats. Thunderstorm is absolutely amazing and works for me.

Wishing you and yours,

Good health, sincerely P

ANSWER

Dear P,

Can you supply us with a source to obtain the binaural device?  As you point out, every AA and EDS patient should be on the standard protocol.  Once on it try new approaches (i.e. stem cells, amniotic fluid, electromagnetic, etc.)  Binauaral is new but the theory is good and your experience is most helpful. Please keep us informed. Thank you for sharing.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dr. Tennant, 

Thank you so much for your response, I will get on the paperwork immediately. But I have one question, what do you think of the “Stem Cell Treatment” they are doing in Arizona? 

KB 

ANSWER 

Dear KB,

I get asked a lot about stem cells, electrical stimulators, and various intravenous therapies (e.g. ketamine, lidocaine, vitamin C).  All these are treatments that may TEMPORARILY provide relief – BUT NO RECOVERY.  I endorse all of these attempts (no guarantee of success) under one condition.  First, be on the standard medical protocol with drugs for: anti-neuroinflammation, neuroregeneration, and pain control as well as a daily routine with physiologic measures such as walking, stretching, and spinal fluid flow exercises.  The bottom line is this: you have a life-time, chronic disease that must be treated on a daily basis.  There is no cure, so forget miracles and develop a practical, day-to-day program of control, relief, and some recovery. Don’t count on a single, measure.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Hi Dr. Tennant,

I just found this Turmeric Tea and one serving has 750mg of Turmeric and black pepper extract. In many in-depth articles it says in order to fully absorb Turmeric it must be taken with a fat or black pepper. This is another great way for your patients to take Turmeric. I’ll be posting this on my Intractable Pain Self Help Group as well.

D

ANSWER

Dear D,

Thanks for the tip on Turmeric Tea.  I’m posting your “self-help tip” on my website and I’m glad you are posting it on yours.  We need to share as many tips as we can. Given the dysfunctionality of our health system every patient with AA or other debilitating, chronic diseases need to champion “self-help” as good medical help is getting scarce.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dear Dr. Tennant,

I suffer from AA. I would like to know if IV gadolinium contrast for a pancreatic MRI could be harmful for my condition. Thank you very much for your kind attention-and for the hope you are giving us AA sufferers. Best regards, DF

ANSWER

Dear DF,

I do not believe gadolinium will be harmful.  Gadolinium has proven to be remarkedly safe.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dear Dr. Tennant,

Just a question regarding taking hormones.  Is it safe to take hormones?  Is there a chance that they can cause cancer if taken?

My mom has had arachnoiditis for over 20 years.  She started taking the supplements you suggest.  She gets relief sometimes but experiences a lot of flares.  She wants to add hormones but her primary doctor is against it because he said doesn’t prescribe hormones.  What are your feelings on this?

Thanks, MP

ANSWER

Dear MP,

I’m very high on the hormones that are available without a prescription.  They are regulated by FDA and quite safe.

Try one at a time.  Dosages are on the label.

  1. Pregnenolone 200-300 mg a day
  2. DHEA 200 mg a day
  3. Adrenal Extracts (Raw Adrenal, Adrenal Caps)
  4. Orchex® (gonadal)

To be safe I recommend that hormones be taken 3 to 5 days a week – not every day.  You have to order Orchex® over the internet, but the others can be obtained in your local health food store.  Try one for 2 weeks before you try another.

Let me know how it goes.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Good Morning Dr. Tennant,

Thank you for your correspondence. I want to know if it is safe for me to receive the newer Shingles Vaccination since I have Arachnoiditis. I called the CDC but was advised to talk to a healthcare professional.

I do believe I had the first vaccine after the MRI in Jan of 2018 but was not aware of my diagnosis.

I certainly want to prevent any additional pain but also want to be safe.

Thank you, NG

ANSWER

Dear NG,

I recommend the shingles vaccination in AA patients. An AA patient who develops herpes zoster (shingles) can really have a setback.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dr. Tennant,

Has lidocaine infusion ever been proven effective with AA patients?

Sincerely, MW

ANSWER 

Dear MW,

Three kinds of infusions have been successfully used in AA patients:

  1. Lidocaine
  2. Vitamin C
  3. Ketamine

I recommend all 3 once the patient is on a medical program that consists of at least one agent from each of the 3 essential treatment components: anti-neuroinflammation, neuroregeneration, and pain control.  The three infusions have one characteristic.  They provide good relief for as long as 3 or 4 months, but then, former symptoms return.  My theory is that AA is a neuroinflammatory disease and these infusions either reduce neuroinflammation and/or alter nerve conduction.  If you are on our recommended protocol with at least one agent from the 3 essential categories, you will most likely get good results with an infusion or electric stimulator.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Hello,

I have an appointment with a Dr. who is willing to look over the protocols and may start the treatments with me. I have the Patient and Family Handbook (5th edition) but I don’t have the Clinical Protocols for Medical Practitioners. I’d like to supply that information when I go to the Dr. Will you please forward them to me along with any other information you think May be helpful to bring?

Thank you very much, KS

ANSWER

Dear KS,

Attached are our diagnostic and treatment protocols.  As you start developing your medical program, be clearly advised that it needs 3 components: anti-neuroinflammation, neuroregeneration, and pain control.  In addition to medical treatment, please adopt some of the physical and exercise measures which are in the handbook.

As you start your medical protocol, be clearly advised that patients who have done the best take at least one of the following:

  1. ketorolac, 2 to 3 times a week;
  2. methylprednisolone, 2 to 3 times a week;
  3. low dose naltrexone, 3 to 6 times a week.

Why are these drugs so effective?  AA is a neuroinflammatory disease and these agents suppress neuroinflammation.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant MD, DrPh

Hello Dr Tennant,

I am one with lifelong EDS. I continue to struggle with the ups and downs and frequent flares which are believed to be AA. My doctor has agreed, and we are looking for a “sweet spot” with the steroids as it seems to be the one thing that will calm things down enough to allow me to at least be somewhat functional. I am about to start hormone replacement with nandrolone as well as finally approved for ketorolac. I also use several of your other recommendations. I was wondering if you would take a look at my MRI’s? I am happy to pay whatever the cost is or make another donation to the foundation. I don’t know if they show anything or not but it’s almost like each radiologist that looks at my MRIs has a completely different opinion and interpretation. My neurologist believes this is cerebral and cervical arachnoiditis based off the surgeon finding severe arachnoid adhesions throughout the brain and cervical area during the chiari and cervical surgery. At that time, he tried to reestablish flow in several areas. The latest CINE MRI was read as- “nonexistent biphasic CSF flow around the posterior cerebellum and minimal flow in several other areas”. They say there is “plenty of room” so the flow is not being pinched. I have some real odd symptoms as well. When the flares are bad, I have headaches and ear/eye symptoms that are just crazy but strangely I also get mid pack pain that only happens with the flares. The pain is severe and such that I can’t sit or stand for any length of time. The pain builds, and the area swells and feels like it built a pocket of fluid around the spinal area. It will progress to the point of weak legs and some urinary incontinence. When I don’t have a flare there is zero back pain. MRIs are read as essentially normal in that area?   My Neurologist and GP as well as myself would love to get your interpretation if at all possible.

Again, I certainly appreciate your time, BG

ANSWER

Dear BG,

First, I would like to see your MRI’s as well as those of other patients with both a genetic connective tissue disease (GCTD) and AA.  Frankly, I view the combination of GCTD and AA to be the number one pain challenge in America today.  Unfortunately, both of these conditions are greatly misunderstood, and there is great denial and resistance with both conditions.  When you have both, you have to work hard with a caring physician to develop a program that “works”. Due to my concern about “dual diseases”, I wrote the attached paper on “Anabolic Therapy”.  At this point in time, I firmly believe that all patients, like you, with the dual diseases need to be on an anabolic therapy program.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant MD, DrPh

Hello,

Was wondering if you could explain odd smells and AA. So several of us on a FaceBook group are having very strange smells. For me, you’ve said that my images appear to have of have had a spinal fluid leak… could it be that of the AA? Most of the time I have a strong smell of burning, or cigarettes. It’s hard to explain. My breathing feels shallow. No one around me can smell the burning smell. They all think I have lost my mind! I feel as though I need more oxygen. It’s happening more and more frequently. Mostly before a flare up, but then continues sometimes for day. I have mentioned it to my doctors and they either say nothing or that it is nothing. What do you think? Also, I went back to the Orthopedic surgeon that sent me to get the epidural that went bad. The PA said that she could definitely see some nerve clumping and still suggested that I have facet injections at L4L5 S1… any thoughts on this? My MRI says that I still have suggestion of small abscesses in the L5S1 area.

WM

ANSWER

Dear W,

You are not imagining strange smells. This occurs in AA patients who have spinal fluid flow disturbances.  At this time, I am uncertain whether it is due to blockage of fluid by nerve root clumps and adhesions or if strange smells are a specific sign of spinal fluid leakage.

I recommend a therapeutic trial of acetazolamide – 125 mg twice a day for 5 days. Some patients do remarkably well as acetazolamide regulates spinal fluid flow.

I’m currently researching hormonal creams to help stop leakage in the lumbar area. I’ll send you the formulas for the cream if you and your physician wish to try them.

Best wishes, Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

Dr. Tennant I have a question.

I sent all my information over to you a few months back and you confirmed my neurosurgeon’s diagnosis of adhesive arachnoiditis that I have had for years. My question to you is this, I just got diagnosed with multiple sclerosis after a week stay in the hospital and my neurologist told me that the symptoms of AA and MS are the same so here’s my question.  Are they? Or can you have both? I know you are the doctor to ask and I plan on asking Dr. Eat the accurate pain clinic who studied under you that I started seeing recently in Louisiana.  I know you are the “go to” doctor to ask. I’ve been crying my eyes out for a week trying to wrap my brain around this. Can you please help me understand if I could have both, or do I just have the one? I would really appreciate an answer if you could. Thank you so much.

Sincerely, A

ANSWER

Dear A,

Some AA symptoms may mimic those of multiple sclerosis (MS).  AA is primarily a neuroinflammatory disease, and, in later stages may develop an autoimmune disorder that may cause or mimic MS.  Although we have unanswered questions on whether a patient may have both or whether AA can cause MS, one thing is clear.  You need aggressive treatment for AA.  The biggest problem we have with AA is “undertreatment”.  Patients and physicians just want to treat AA with neuropathic and other symptomatic drugs.  Review therapeutic trials in our handbook.  You need to immediately identify some agents that give you relief. I am aware of several patients that have been given both diagnoses. At this time, however, I really think they only have one disease AA, and it gives symptoms of MS.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant MD, DrPh

Dr. Tennant,

Thanks for the info. But after 2 minutes of meeting the PA at my Pain doctor’s clinic, he told me my problems were mostly “psychogenic” I asked how he differentially diagnosed this in 2 minutes. He said it was a “gut feeling” I asked if he had any training in psychiatry or psychogenic pain. He did not. So, found my previous doctor who I really liked, now is his own practice, and he recommended Kratom as well. He said, “It can’t be more dangerous than the opioids, but he did not know how to obtain it.  Here is my real question.

He wants to do another MRI w/ contrast. I know this is diagnostic, but when you saw my MRI you saw the nerve root clumping as I did. That MRI was 3 years ago. Is there a good reason to do another with contrast?

Current SX:  My parathesia and cold in my feet have become more pain, than cold. The main pain I have is the left, SI joint (inguinal area and hip) and its painful to stand and walk very long.

Any advice is appreciated, D

ANSWER

 Dear D,

Kratom can be obtained from multiple internet sites, and it is sold in stores in some states.

If your doctor wants a new MRI and your insurance will pay for it, I would get it.  Why?  A recent MRI which shows classic signs of AA such as nerve root enlargement, displacement, clumping, and adhesion formation will give your medical practitoners solid reasons to prescribe AA medications.  Keep in mind that our AA medication protocol contains a new and potent combination of drugs.  What’s more an MRI is the best way to educate the ignorant people who want to say your pain is psychogenic and all you need is “psychotherapy”.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dr Tennant,

I’m taking 1 mg low dose Naltrexone 5x per week,200 mg of DHEA (100 morning and night) PEA 2 morning and 2 at night, raw adrenal (1 morning 1 night), Methylprednisolone every 2-3 days, and bio- curcumin (1 morning and 1 night). I have been able to go without my TENS unit for 3 nights. My legs aren’t having the weird nerve issues. Other things I take are Cymbalta®, valerian root (rarely need Valium now) Xeljanz® (for arthritis) biotin-b, high doses of collagen, pro-biotics and multi vitamin. All those are extras and for arthritis. The first list is the helpful things for arachnoiditis. I still have some weakness in my legs and spasms but even those are improving. I’m back to exercising and building my strength. Look forward to seeing you in February. Thank you so much for all your help! There are days that I actually can say I feel good! My emotions have stabilized because I don’t feel tortured every day! Such improvement!

Thank you, thank you, TS

 ANSWER

 Dear T,

Your medication program is quite complex, but you have the dual problem of psoriatic arthritis and adhesive arachnoiditis (AA).  Dual conditions require a complex medication program.  Other patients with dual conditions such as EDS and AA, or Lupus and AA must learn to do what you are doing.  You are “showing the way”.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Good Morning Dr. Tennant, This is AW from TX. My family has been profoundly touched by your help in this past year when you helped me get the diagnosis and treatment I desperately needed back in February 2018 (over the phone).  I continue to receive your ongoing research and email updates which have been instrumental in my continuing care here in TX with my Pain Management Docs. I wanted to thank you properly for you and your wife’s help and wish you blessings on your continued journey. I am also reaching out with a request to find out if you have a formal research foundation which can receive tax deductible donations for the purpose of ongoing research? I would like to have the proper information on hand as I have already been asked where money can he sent asap. A physical address and phone number would be the most helpful because it is a check that needs to be sent. There are many others like me who would like to make sure your research is funded as long as possible! If you are not receiving or cannot receive tax deductible donations can you please make a suggestion as to where this research money would go to best use?

Thank you and God Bless! AW

 ANSWER

Dear AW,

Your offer is most appreciated.  The Tennant Foundation particulars are attached.

You may be surprised to know that the Tennant Foundation was formed in 1992, and it has helped fund my research and writing since that time.  I realize that the closure of my clinic, which was subsidized by the Tennant Foundation, gave the impression that I retired.  This is not so.  I continue to work full-time, but it is now solely dedicated to research and writing.  Any donations will be most graciously accepted and put to good use.

One result of our research is the brand new, ink barely dry, report on “Hormones and Pain Care, Update 2019”, which is attached.  I believe every chronic pain patient should read this report, based on research, as it lays out “the way forward”.

Please let all concerned parties know that they can expect a pretty constant stream of bulletins, alerts, and reports based on our research.  My goal is to bring arachnoiditis and EDS treatment to every community.  Please stay in touch.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

 

Dr. Tennant,

Thank you. I finally found a Dr that listened to me. She’s an orthopedic. She gave me 12 days of prednisone. Is the ketorolac injections mandatory at this point? I do feel a big improvement with the prednisone. Thank you for your help

LV

ANSWER

Dear LV,

Its great news that you feel better with the prednisone.  At this point I would hope you can get by with prednisone on 3 to 5 days a week.  Ketorolac can now be made as a troche by a compounding pharmacy which eliminates the need for an injection.  A once or twice weekly dose of ketorolac for a short time (e.g. 2-3 months) would likely be helpful.  Our new handbook which we sent to you lists some alternatives to ketorolac.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

I’m sorry to bother you Dr Tennant,

I just have one question I have a sitting job. I’m a Psych nurse assistant I work nights watching patients so I must sit on a chair all night I have a donut pillow to take pressure off my tailbone and nerves. My butt hurts. Is there a pillow you recommend that’s better to use and will my AA get worse while sitting for so long? Some nights I’m in pain and others I’m not at all, but lately I have been. I fell on my Butt a few days ago in the hallway of my building. What would be the best thing for me to do? I am following your recommendations of supplements to take.

Thank you, CD

ANSWER

 Dear CD,

Your question is a good one.  The old “donut hole” pillow is still the best. I don’t like to see an AA patient sit for over 20-30 minutes in one position.  Why?  There is the possibility you can squeeze or injure a nerve clump.  Simply standing for 1-2 minutes will usually eliminate most risk.  If your posterior is aching, try ice, heat, Lidocaine Patch and magnets.  These physiologic measures work in different patients.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dear Dr. Tennant,

A quick note of thanks for your continued research and reporting on issues relating to chronic pain.  I’ve had AA for well over 25 years and very much appreciate your efforts and insights.

In addition to the information and protocols you have passed on, I have had great success by understanding and working w/ the mind/body connection’s role in chronic pain.   In that regard, here are two books you may find of interest:

The Divided Mind by Dr. John Sarno

Think Away Your Pain by Dr. David Schechter

Thanks again! S

ANSWER

Dear S,

Thanks for your tips.  I’m going to put your note on our letter section.  Great info!

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dear Dr. Tennant,

I hope things are well for you and Miriam. I am definitely struggling due to pain. One of the things you recommend to get rid of electricity in the spine is something I have always done and it has helped. I thought it was just a way of trying to deal with the pain. I have always sat on the side of the bed. Rocking back and forth helps when the pain is so severe I just can’t stand it. I got to thinking about it and realized it actually does help. So, I wanted to let you know just to confirm research etc. Thank you so much for providing me with the ability to live a better life for a short time. Take care.

C, RN

ANSWER

 Dear C,

Thanks for the tip.  We’ll put it on our website. Our handbook lists several physiologic measures to facilitate spinal fluid flow and eliminate electricity. Every AA patient needs a good medication and physiologic measures program.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Thank you, Dr. Tennant! 

I started taking the 30 mg. Ketorolac troches last Wednesday, alternating with prednisone. WOW!!! The ketorolac troches have practically taken my pain down to a “0!” Unbelievable! It is even working on my pudendal nerve pain!!! I am beginning to feel like a normal person again.

I am beyond grateful!!! Maybe the ketorolac troches are the miracle drug I have been waiting for. I think I might get my life back. Thank you so very much!

I received the new handbook and am studying it diligently!!!  I am thinking of adding DHEA to my protocol as I believe it would be beneficial to fatigued adrenal glands. I already take Serrapeptase. I have added the bovine adrenal extract you suggested.

I will keep my oxytocin and ketamine troches for “emergency” break through pain. I take 200 mg Tramadol ER daily, so I hope I won’t have any adverse reactions if I need to use these 2 troches. Perhaps I could even discontinue the Tramadol at some point as the Ketorolac is knocking the pain out almost completely!

I have happily sent a donation to the Tennant Foundation. I am so appreciative of all your help.

Many Blessings!!!  MM

ANSWER

 Dear MM,

You are embarking upon a treatment program that gets results.  You are using what I call the “low dose, intermittent” approach which will keep you from getting side effects.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dr. Tennant,

Thank you for this bulletin. I’ve been seeing a functional medicine doctor here in Corvalis, Oregon that’s wonderful. Her name is Dr. C and is friends with Dr. W. She’s run a battery of tests that Medicare paid for and is treating my endocrine system, stomach, and vitamin deficiencies. I’ve been seeing her since August of 2018 and have had a marked improvement. My flares have decreased in length and intensity, which I couldn’t be any happier about. I’ve been recommending that other AA sufferers see a MD functional medicine doctor. I’m her second AA patient and I was referred there by another AA sufferer. Dr. C now has a year and a half wait which I’m hoping that other MD’s learn from her lead. You’ve read my MRI and are aware that I have severe AA, so this is a miracle for me. I’m looking forward to the day that the medical community starts accepting (insurance pays for) homeopathic treatments. That’s the only downside is the cost of my supplements. I’m on a fixed income and it’s a little overwhelming, along with my organic anti-inflammatory diet, to pay for. Some of the supplements are temporary so I’m hoping to get a break soon. Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have.

EB

ANSWER

Dear EB,

I’m so pleased about your report.  It sounds like we need a few dozen Dr. C’s.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Hi Dr. Tennant,

Has anyone tried ultrasound successfully for adhesive arachnoiditis?

Thanks, ST

ANSWER

Dear ST,

I’ve used ultrasound on many adhesive arachnoiditis patients. It is a great adjunct to the medical protocol we use.  I particularly believe ultrasound helps heal spinal fluid leaks.  I usually put a corticoid or other hormonal cream under the ultrasound.  I also like to rotate it with infrared.

For your information they now make some ultrasound devices for at-home use. They cost $200-$400.  They are highly recommended.

Best wishes, Forest Tennant

Dear Dr. Tennant:

Thanks for the info Dr. Tennant.  Do you see many patients that also have leaky gut with AA?  My leaky gut started about 9 months after my 3rd and final surgery.  When I eat, some proteins get by.  They seem to enhance pain in my weak spots.  Back, legs, joints, and sinuses.  I am highly allergic to gluten, preservatives, bread, and pasta.  I believe you talked about the interference with autonomic nervous system as the potential culprit.  Is this the case?  Is my leaky gut unsolvable and connected to my AA?

Thanks, BF

ANSWER

Dear BF,

The intestine has a complex neurologic control system.  Some of the control is from the vagus nerve which goes directly from the brain down through the neck and chest to the intestine.  Other nerves go from the lumbar cauda equina nerve roots to the intestine.  Unfortunately, the cauda equina nerve roots are the ones that can become entrapped in the nerve root clumping and adhesions of AA.  You describe a typical complication of AA.  Many patients must eat a “gluten-free” or “almost gluten free” diet.  Above all, almost every AA patient will need to take some probiotics from time-to-time.  Yogurt, cottage cheese, and ice cream/sherbert can also be helpful.

AA patients need to be on a protocol which includes antineuroinflammatory, neuroregeneration, and pain relief medications along with spinal fluid flow exercises to keep all complications, including gastrointestinal ones, in check.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dear Dr. Tennant,

Thank you very much for taking your time to help me.

Sadly, I have not been able to find any local Dr to treat me.  Seems the Affordable Care Act is neither affordable nor provides ANY CARE!

Consequently, I have dropped my health insurance and am going to begin investing in myself in a wellness program to heal me.

Ironic, just before the holidays my pain doc cut me loose as my health has been deteriorating since they began screwing with my meds THAT WORKED SO VERY WELL!

I have been taking a concoction of natural and homemade remedies. Will need pain relief still but have no idea where to receive it, and I really do not like the option of going to the street to buy my pain meds as who knows what one will receive?

I’m sure the government’s new eugenics health care system will thin out the herd of the most fragile individuals.

Wishing you a very blessed and prosperous New Year!

Blessings! S

ANSWER

Dear S,

Patients who have been cut off of opioids have been finding non-opioid alternatives and some have been going to foreign countries to obtain opioids.  Unfortunately, some have given up and committed suicide.

Be advised.  Kratom is a non-prescription opioid, and it is now widely marketed.  I know of many patients who have been cut off of opioids who take kratom and other non-opioid pain relievers to stay comfortable and function.  Our website lists several non-opioid alternatives. Don’t give up. We are getting better non-opioid or low dose opioid alternatives about every week.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Thank you so much Dr. Tennant.

I gave the information to my Doctor and he has started me on low dose prednisone once a day. I hope this can help with the inflammation as well as any leaking spinal fluid as well as the odd sensations I been having for almost three years since my ablation and transforaminal injections. I have to say Adhesive Arachnoiditis is a very, very bad disease and truly your dedication is beyond words to say how much respect I have for you. I am trying my best to gain my health back but know this is a life challenge for me. I truly appreciate all your help and wish you a great New Year.

Sincerely, KE

ANSWER

Dear KE,

Prednisone will probably stop leakage, but it often doesn’t enter the spinal fluid in a high enough concentration to help dissolve adhesions and suppress neuroinflammation.  After a month or so, you may wish to switch to low dose Medrol® (2 to 4 mg) on 3 to 5 days a week.

We’re getting ready to send out some bulletins and treatment alerts on spinal fluid leakage.  Be on the lookout for them.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

Dear Dr. Tennant,

I wanted to thank you, I was able to get a prescription for a Medrol® pack from my doctor – it is like a miracle! It’s the first time I haven’t felt pain in two years. I can think clearly again which I haven’t been able to for two years. My husband is surprised that I can move better again! I had almost stopped being able to.
At first (in October, and before Christmas) my doctor would only prescribe prednisone as she said it was stronger, despite my telling her Medrol® absorbs better for my condition. Two days ago, I was prescribed the Medrol pack finally. The prednisone never got rid of the pain and simply seemed to stop working last time.
Thank you again, I have been suffering for two years, and I finally feel some relief.  They haven’t prescribed LDN (low dose naltrexone) for me yet, but I am trying to get it also. From my understanding it works similar to Medrol® and perhaps safer long term.  Thank you again, KM

ANSWER

Dear K,

Once we find that Medrol (methylprednisolone) relieves pain and increases “range of motion”, we highly recommend a dose of 2 to 4 mg on Mon, Wed, Fri.  Also, we like to see the patient take turmeric/curcumin, serrapeptase, or ketorolac on off days. If you can get LDN, you should continue Medrol® 2 or 3 times a week, and you will have an excellent program.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant