We will publish letters and comments on this site.  They will rotate often as we believe actual letters and case reports are an excellent resource for arachnoiditis patients to improve their care.  Send your letter to “Arachnoiditis Research & Education Project“.

You may send your questions to tennantfoundation92@gmail.com, fax to 626-919-7497, or mail to:

The Tennant Foundation

Arachnoiditis Research Project

336-338 S. Glendora Ave.

West Covina, CA 91790-3043

YOUR QUESTIONS AND OUR ANSWERS ARE UPDATED FREQUENTLY

Tennant Foundation,

Maybe the doctor has heard of it before but as I look more into Cerebrolysin I’m beginning to think it’s going to be instrumental in helping people with nerve damage, spinal cord injuries, head trauma, and dementia. Please let me know if anything comes of it, in all the Arachnoiditis groups and research I’ve done over the past year and a half I haven’t seen a single mention of Cerebrolysin.

Thanks, A

ANSWER

Dear A,

Cerebrolysin is a polypeptide which is a chain of amino acids.  I know of one physician who is using this polypeptide plus others with great success.  It may have great potential in spinal cala inflammatory disorders, including adhesive arachnoiditis (AA).  Please let us know about any cases or results from its use.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant

Tennant Foundation,

I have looked into physical therapy/decompression therapy for my bulging disc at L5-S1. I was wondering if, in your opinion, this would be okay since I have not yet formed adhesions and just have inflammation. I am hoping physical therapy would help decrease some of the inflammation around this disc.

Thank you, AS

ANSWER

Dear AS,

Your question is a top one today.  I can’t get you a single physical measure for persons with a herniated disc that I can be sure is effective.  Let me know how your therapy works.

At this time, I believe in stretching the upper body and arms multiple (3 to 4) times a day and spinal fluid flow exercises.  I also like electromagnetic therapies.  I also believe you need to be on a nutritional program of specific foods and supplements.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant

Tennant Foundation,

I was diagnosed by Tennant with Arachnoiditis in February of this year. I’ve not been on the full protocol, only anti-inflammatory supplements and LDN and a low dose of gabapentin. I got Arachnoiditis due to a childbirth epidural, I have two kids and just found out I’m pregnant again. Can I continue taking the supplements and LDN? I’m terrified of the pain and to get worst. Any recommendations for pregnant women with arachnoiditis? I’m scared my body won’t handle it

Thanks, SA

ANSWER

Dear SA,

You do not have to stop your treatment.  To date we have not had any complications for mother or baby.  The worst thing you can do is let AA flare or you could endanger yourself and/or your baby.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant

Tennant Foundation,

Based on the 90-day, every 14-day regimen that they are giving me now (4mg Dexamethasone, 30mg Ketorolac and 1cc of Vitamin B), what dosage of these three components should I be on, once the 90-day start up is done? I have to be able to spoon-feed this info to the VA, or I’ll be screwed again.  I was under the impression that I would never be off the Protocol once I started it.

Many thanks, Dr. Tennant…my nerve type pain is still bad, but the burning pain is all but gone now.

Thanks, DP

ANSWER

Dear DP,

I would not stop the injections after 90 days.  You can perhaps lower the dose or extend the time between injections.

All parties must realize that AA, like rheumatoid arthritis of the knee, is an inflammatory disease of the spinal canal.  The basis of treatment is suppression of inflammation and autoimmunity.  A lot of patients are finding oral agents to do this, but, to date, nothing has been as consistently effective as ketorolac and methylprednisolone.

Best wishes, Forest Tennant

Tennant Foundation,

Does rubbing a magnet on the spine apply to those with hardware, e.g., lumbar fusions, artificial discs, screws, etc.?

Thank you, DJ

ANSWER

Dear DJ,

The only contraindication to magnet and copper rubbing is an implanted electric stimulator.

Best wishes, Forest Tennant

Thank you so much Dr. Tennant,

I have been on chronic prednisone for 5+ years for autoimmune disease. I recently tried switching to methylprednisolone, but it greatly flared my mast cell activation syndrome, so I am back to regular prednisone.  Luckily, regular prednisone does help me with AA pain. I am trying to determine if my thoracic pain is from arachnoiditis or my autoimmune Stiff Person Syndrome.

I appreciate you and all the time and passion you use to research and provide guidance on arachnoiditis. Your bulletins are outstanding.

By the way, PEA has been fantastic for me for both AA pain and it has helped my mast cell syndrome quite a bit too.

Warmest Regards, DO

ANSWER

Dear DO,

With your condition you need a corticosteroid that “fits you”.  Stay with the prednisone.  Your thoracic pain is probably your autoimmune disease and not AA.  Pain from AA is lower back.

Best wishes, Forest Tennant

Hi Dr. Tennant,

Can large arachnoid granulations be a site where the body cyphens out too much CSF or leaks from?

Thanks, DC

ANSWER

Dear DC,

AA sites leak frequently.  Actually, AA almost always involves the dura.  Persons who can’t fully extend their arms have had chronic “seepage” through the AA site.  The seepage problem is a major reason why AA patients need to be on some tissue regrowth supplements.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant

Hello, Dr. Tennant.

I have been suffering from dizziness for a long time. I took a lot of medications that did not help me. I have very strong nausea; headache and I can’t keep my balance. The doctor I was with told me that I had a problem with the vestibular system, but not only because of that, but probably because of high or low pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid. What can I do to find out what’s going on? What medications can I take to alleviate this condition a bit? I was diagnosed with adhesive arachnoiditis in 2019.

Thanks, JS

ANSWER

Dear JS,

The symptoms you describe are common with AA.  We do recommend trials of acetazolamide and PEA.  If you have MRI-documented AA, you need to be on a full protocol that includes 3-elements.  Also, you will benefit from our website and handbook (Amazon).

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant

Good day Tennant Foundation,

I have read in the bulletins that you may experience sexual problems.  Can you please give me more information regarding this?  What happens? In my case I first experience dryness but now the opening of the vaginal area is almost completely closed. Is this part of AA? Or should I consult with a gynecologist?

Kind regards, Blessing always, JVW

ANSWER

Dear JVW,

AA and some of the medications, particularly opioids, cause these hormones to deplete: estrogen, testosterone, progesterone, cortisol, DHEA.  You need a hormone panel blood test.  The symptoms you describe are probably due to estrogen deficiency.  You and your physicians should develop a hormone replenishment program – both cream and systemic.  I still like the monthly estrogen injection.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant

Tennant Foundation,

I can’t believe I’ve been in pain management for over 20 years, and have, quite by accident, literally heard of this condition only TODAY… It’s both inspiring and disheartening at the same time… Inspiring because this may account for decades of severe chronic pain, and that there may be some hope for relief, but disheartening that no pain management practitioner has ever even mentioned/considered this as a reason for years of spinal and/or nerve pain.

I would appreciate any information that would possibly help, including any list of doctors who have made this diagnosis and treatment a central part of their practice.

Kindest Regards, CR

ANSWER

Dear CR,

Your message is sad, but most of the medical profession, until recently, hadn’t heard of AA.  Don’t be confused – it is very serious but simple to understand.  AA is an intraspinal canal inflammation that “glues” nerve roots and the spinal canal covering together by adhesions.  Untreated, it becomes the worst pain imaginable.  As a first step, please review our website and obtain our handbook from Amazon.  To ground yourself and build a good program, learn our recommended nutrition and physical measures.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant

Thanks Dr. Tennant! I really appreciate you!

I am doing fine. I have had a good pain management program for several years now. The doubt was within my family. I traced it to my brothers second wife and had everything to do with money and nothing to do with truth and reality.

I am financially & physically independent. I just fit my life around the pain as if it were another body part. I live happily despite the pain. I am so thankful that I know what is causing it and how to control it.

I will be forever grateful to you and the Tennant Foundation for all the information and helpful suggestions. I use a lot of them as part of my daily life. I look forward to your future bulletins.

God bless you Dr. Tennant! C

ANSWER

Dear C,

Thanks for the kind words.  We have a lot of new information and products to help all AA patients build a better and better program.  Stay tuned!!

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant

Tennant Foundation,

I have had a diagnostic colonoscopy (negative results, other than the GI doctor says I have a ‘slow colon’…or Neurogenic Colon, flaccid type), more blood work (don’t know the results yet), two series of your medical protocol (it’s like rocket fuel…huge changes already). The burning in my spine is almost gone now, though that exposed the underlying nerve pain…that’s easier to handle for me. The head pressure is down, roaring in my ears seems to be better, not having the early morning sweats, chills, and other weird stuff. Sinus issues are better, as is eye pain. My respiration is better too, as is my BP. Not sure how the protocol would change that, but it seems to have done so!

Other than the things I had already mentioned to you that I am taking, I’ve added PEA 400mg, Magnesium Threonate 500mg, DHEA 200mg, B12 complex, vitamin C 1,000mg and Collagen Peptides, is there anything else you’d recommend right now?

If my colon is being affected by my spine…either mechanical impingement or nerve encapsulation, could they find the specific area through an enhanced MRI? Would that even matter? Or is the colon issue now more likely permanent?

Hope you’re well and safe! Many thanks! BP

ANSWER

Dear BP,

The “slow” colon is a result of some nerve root entrapment in the arachnoiditis mass.  As you loosen up the mass, your colon will “speed up”.  There are two new, non-prescription agents I highly recommend: Curaphen® and Adrenalplex®.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant

Hello Dr. Tennant,

I heard your pod cast and you mentioned that everyone with Adhesive Arachnoiditis should take Acetazolamide for headaches, dizziness, fogginess, blurred vision etc.  I do not have those symptoms at this time. I did have them in January 2020 before I started your protocol. You indicated that I have severe adhesive arachnoiditis and a collagen disorder in your letter to me.

Should I take Acetazolamide as a preventative medication or only when I have those symptoms?

You suggested Deer Antler Velvet supplements for me in your letter. What kind of results have you seen with this supplement? It is an expensive supplement, and I was hoping for guidance before I decided to take it.

Thank you so much for all your help! AL

ANSWER

Dear AL,

You can give acetazolamide a trial.  Start with 1 tablet a day and add another after 3 days.  Stop after a week if no result.

Deer antler velvet is a natural hormonal agent that helps nerves and other tissues regenerate.  Try it for 3 weeks.  Some people greatly benefit from it.  There is a new product call Adrenalplex® It may be equal or better than deer antler velvet.  Colostrum is another option.  To get permanent, not just temporary improvement, hormonal agents that help regrow nerves are almost essential.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant

Tennant Foundation,

I have a question about the medications Dr. Tennant talks about in his handbook. I have my appointment with my local orthopedic doctor, Dr. Sahota, on this coming Monday and he’s on board to try the medications Dr. Tennant recommends.

Knowing myself I was thinking of starting with these listed below, but I’m confused if I can/should take Ketorolac/Toradol AND acetazolamide together? Dr. T talks about Acetazolamide reducing spinal fluid flow obstruction and “every person with AA should consider it” (pg. 45 of the handbook) but then states Ketorolac/Toradol (&Medrol) can be the most consistent agents to control/treat AA” (pg. 67 of handbook)?  Before knowing about you guys and AA, my trips to the ER is where they would give me Toradol, and I’d finally get some relief of my pain so that’s why I was “happy” to see it on the list.

Anti-Neuroinflammatory agents: ketorolac (Toradol works on me!) Injection 30-60mg 2-3 days MAX

Neuroregeneration- nandrolone troche 25 mg 3-5 days

Pain control- naltrexone (0.5-1.0mg compound Pharm can make Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) Capsules up to 5.0), 2-4 weeks to see if it works

Any advice would be greatly appreciated so I can go into my appointment on Monday with confidence.

Thanks, J

ANSWER

Dear J,

Your questions are most appropriate.  I’m also aware that the way we physicians describe therapy can be very confusing and intimidating.  Basically, start medications in sequence – not at one time.  You will need a few days to determine if a given medication is working.  Acetazolamide only needs to be taken 3 to 4 days as a trial.  Start with 250 mg the first day.  It helps right away – within 24 hours – or it probably won’t help.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant