We will publish letters and comments on this site.  They will rotate often as we believe actual letters and case reports are an excellent resource for arachnoiditis patients to improve their care.  Send your letter to “Arachnoiditis Research & Education Project“.

You may send your questions to veractinc@msn.com , fax to 626-919-7497, or mail to:

The Tennant Foundation

Arachnoiditis Research Project

336 1/2 S. Glendora Ave.

West Covina, CA 91790-3043

 

Hello Dr. Tennant,

I have shared about using a magnet on the spine in a couple of groups. I have the one you gave me when you saw me as a patient. Do you have reference I can pass on to the one who are asking where to get one? I am forever grateful to you.   I credit you and Miriam to saving my life. I was near suicide when you agreed to see me. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Blessings, NJ

ANSWER

Dear NJ,

I’m delighted to hear from you. Potent magnets are hard to find. How do you use your magnet? I’m very interested. Do you rub it over the area once a day or more often?

I’ve just finished a round of research analysis, and I believe we are grossly underestimating the value of potent magnet rubs over the AA area. Some patients are finding that rubbing the affected area with a magnet (industrial strength approx. 10 lb. pull) helps remove retained electricity. These can be purchased for $15-20 over the internet by searching block magnets. The ones we have used are about 6 inches long so that they have a large flat surface for rubbing on the skin. One source is grainger.com.

Best wishes,

Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

THANK YOU! I don’t know how I missed seeing the doctor’s response.

I cannot begin to describe how I feel right now. I can’t stop trembling, yet in a good way. After all this time, I finally have a diagnosis. Now I can stop wondering and move forward with treatment. My primary care physician acknowledged that he doesn’t understand AA but is willing and eager to implement and manage my care after getting the confirmation from DR. Tennant.

ANSWER

Dear J,

Our research shows that persons with AA have a rather unique profile of symptoms that differentiate them from other back-pain patients. They should be known to all persons with chronic back pain as well as medical practitioners. A mission of the Tennant Foundation is to spread the word to medical practitioners everywhere that persons with AA have a unique symptom profile:

  1. Pain relieved by reclining and or standing;
  2. Stabbing or shooting pains with a sudden turn or bend of the hips or pelvis;
  3. Water dripping or insects crawling on legs;
  4. Burning feet;
  5. Difficulty stopping or starting urination;
  6. Blurred vision.

The sooner that a person is given a diagnosis of AA they can be less depressed, confused, and develop a treatment program for medication and physiologic measures that can provide the best chance for some relief and recovery. The symptom profile of AA is quite unique, so a person needs to know that this unusual set of symptoms goes with a specific disease.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

Hi Dr. Tennant!

Your email made MY day!!! This was a HUGE Christmas gift of good news to me, my husband and our three young boys! Our middle son has made the same Birthday wish for 4 years, that Mommy would be healed. I am very excited to send you my discs to compare, not a problem at all. I am also excited to hear your feedback on my cervical AA too. 🙂

When we spoke in February 2018 you had told my husband and I that I had severe late stages of Adhesive Arachnoiditis in my cervical spine and lumbar spine. You had told me that there were signs of previous or possibly active CSF seepage and/or leakage. At that time, I believe you looked at both my 2015 and 2017 MRIs and both confirmed AA in my lumbar and cervical spines present prior to my speaking with you. You said it was present even in my MRI prior to my Tarlov cyst surgery (2015).

I would ABSOLUTELY love to share what I have been doing. I started an online business and blog a couple of months ago. I am documenting my health journey there. I am working on updating the health protocols I have used and will share them with you once I have it all together. YOUR guidance to my Pain Management Doctors here in Dallas was a HUGE turning point for me in 2018. The Toradol and Dexamethasone injections 3x a week along with Acetazolamide – were game changers! Now, in addition to the Tennant Protocol and a Ketogenic diet, I have a DNA specific supplements protocol that made another BIG turning point 3 months ago! I am down to only needing Acetazolamide a few times a month. My pain is MUCH better managed, and I am taking less opioids and no muscle relaxers anymore.
Dr. Tennant, I have one more thing I would really like to talk to you about. My company I just launched, gives back 10% of its profits each month to a specific Rare Disease Foundation or Cause. I wanted to ask you if the Tennant Foundation would be willing to be our January Rare Disease Foundation Donation recipient? 🙂 My company (Rare Love) and all its customers would love the opportunity to give back to the Foundation that has helped so many! I am very grateful you have given me a path towards healing my body and getting my life back so I CAN work again!!! It would be an honor to be able to highlight and give back to the Tennant Foundation this month!

Thanks, so much Dr. Tennant! Take Care and I look forward to speaking again soon!
Your friend from Dallas, TX – AW

ANSWER

Dear A,

I will be happy to review your old and new MRI’s. An important aspect of our research is to determine if MRI images can show improvement. Some persons with AA improve dramatically as you have, but their MRI’s still show the scars left behind after the inflammation has subsided. I’ve attached the report we recently wrote for the registry of the National Organization for Rare Disorders. The Tennant Foundation will be honored to receive your donation as AA is the only disease we assist. I plan to share your story, and I hope you do likewise. Too many persons with AA still believe they can’t be helped. Please feel free to disseminate any of our information that will help us meet our goal of bringing AA diagnosis and treatment to every community.

Best wishes,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPh

Dr. Tennant … Dr. Is a man used by God to help people, I started his protocol against adhesive arachnoiditis, and I am much better than ever before. I have had my life almost normal. Many things I did not do I am already doing. More cheer for everything, less pain. My neurosurgeon will accompany me and study your articles and protocols … Congratulations for your dedication, I found your Foundation wonderful, what a noble attitude. Congratulations … The Lord is in my prayers forever. One day I still want to get to know you in person. God bless you and keep giving wisdom. Thank you very much and my family already has a great affection for the Lord. Everyone is sending a big hug. A

ANSWER

Dear A,

I truly feel blessed and believe that my motivation to spend full-time researching and educating on AA is directed by the Lord. A few years ago, I had neither heard of this horrible disease nor envisioned that I would do the work I’m now doing. Please keep sharing your experiences and success. Together, with the Lord’s help, we can bring diagnosis and treatment of AA to every community.

Best wishes,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPh

Hello Dr.,

I was wondering if AA is constant? If I were to have AA would it be possible to go months at a time with very little pain or symptoms? I had suspected I might have AA after receiving an epidural injection that made my back worse but over a long period of time my nerves seemed to calm down. Now I can go 2-3 months feeling pretty good for the most part until I do something small that completely throws my back out. I am currently having an episode where I can barely move without feeling excruciating pain. I am about to get another MRI, but I feel like any Dr I speak to has no clue about AA. Would I be able to send my images over to you to get a second opinion?

Thank you for your time. NF

ANSWER

Dear NF,

Some mild or moderate cases of AA, just like rheumatoid arthritis, can produce intermittent symptoms. It is unusual, but the pain and other symptoms of AA may almost disappear but then flare as inflammation comes and goes. You will need to be prepared to begin ketorolac and a corticosteroid as soon as a flare starts.

A good review of your MRI is in order. Send them for our review at your earliest convenience.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPh

Dear Dr. Tennant,

I am 42 years old and I suffered a spontaneous CSF leak in February 2019 and have been debilitated ever since. I was previously fit and healthy with no history of headaches or illness. Since February I have not been able to work (I’m a qualified psychotherapist) and have had to spend much of my time lying flat to alleviate my symptoms. I’ve had 3 spine MRI’s all showing extra dural CSF. I’ve had 3 blind epidural blood patches that have given me some improvement. I’ve also had 3 myelograms but unfortunately none have shown the site of my leak. My last myelogram has shown many small cysts which I think could be the source of my persistent slow leak? However, the most worrying thing currently is that my MRI is showing signs of arachnoiditis and nerve clumping in my lower spine. I’ve read your literature and feel very overwhelmed by this possible diagnosis on top of an unresolved CSF leak. Let mem know what you think.

Many thanks, E

ANSWER

Dear E,

Thank you for writing as I’m aware that few physicians are knowledgeable about your situation. A spontaneous CSF leak is a rare event and it usually occurs in persons who have a “genetic connective tissue/collagen disorder” of the Ehlers-Danlos/Marfan (EDS) type. CFS leaks, cyst formation, and AA are common complications of these genetic disorders. It is critical for you to determine if you have EDS. As part of our research into AA, we have learned that the combination of EDS and AA most definitely exists and requires what we refer to as “anabolic therapy”. Anabolism is tissue growth. The treatment consists of our standard 3-omponent medical program plus anabolic hormones, high protein-collagen diet, and light weightlifting. Once a person finds out they have both AA and EDS, we recommend they immediately start colostrum, collagen supplements, and adrenal extract. All are non-prescription supplements that can be obtained at a local health food store.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

Dear sir / madam,

Eight years ago, my father had a back surgery, and during the procedure a bacterium entered a needle, which caused arachnoiditis. Many conversations and investigations have been done with him in recent years, but so far without any result. He is now beginning to give up. I hope to find another possibility in a path that we have not yet found. I have read that the bacteriophage is still being investigated. I would really like to know if this bacteriophage would offer a possibility in my father’s arachnoiditis story. Even if it is only a tiny bit of hope, it would be nice if there were finally a possibility that even slightly, even if it was only 0.1%, could give improvement or relief. I hope you could answer that question, or perhaps have sources / other solutions / addresses where I could go further. It seems that we are running out of possibilities in the Netherlands. That’s why I’m looking abroad.

Best regards, JVZ

ANSWER

Dear JVZ,

Adhesive arachnoiditis (AA) can be caused by any number of infections. Any bacterial or viral agent that enters the spinal canal may theoretically cause AA. I would be most interested to know the name of the agent that your father’s physicians believe may have caused it.

After studying the MRI’s and clinical profile of over 300 cases we generally divide the cases into two basic causes:

1. structural (stenosis, scoliosis, herniated discs, etc.);
2. connective tissue disorders or infections.

Currently we believe that AA should be treated with specific anti-inflammatory and neuroregenerative drugs along with physiologic measures to enhance spinal fluid flow, reduce retained electricity, and maintain extremity (arm and leg) function. Symptomatic pain medication is almost always necessary.

Be clearly advised on this point. Two antibiotics have been observed to help some AA patients: clarithromycin and minocycline. Certainly, your father should have clinical trials of these agents in addition to basic AA treatment. Bacteriophage treatment, to my knowledge, is not yet available.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

Hello Dr Tennant,

I use my magnet about three days a week or when I feel the electricity building up. My husband runs it up and down my spine. I find it helps increase my mobility in my arms an seems to lessen the feel of the electricity traveling through my body. Also, your recommendation of walking barefoot in the grass or sand does help. I think because it has a grounding effect. I follow your protocol and I have shown signs of slight improvement.

NJ

ANSWER

Dear NJ,

The therapeutic concepts of spinal fluid flow enhancement and reduction of retained electricity are new and not yet well-known. The nervous system makes new spinal fluid about every 4 to 6 hours. It cleanses the inflamed area and delivers nutrients and medications to the AA area. Since nerve roots are trapped and even destroyed by AA, electricity can’t pass or move along the neural pathways. It is, therefore, retained which causes heat and inflammation. Magnets and copper are age-old, simple remedies that we believe enhance spinal fluid flow and reduce retained electricity. Walking, water-soaking, and stretching of the arms and legs are other physiologic measures that we believe to be essential and need to be done almost daily to prevent AA from worsening.

The biggest mistake that persons with AA make is to think that AA is mainly a pain problem that just requires symptomatic pain medications.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

Hi Dr. Tennant,

I am doing well; the disease is not in full remission, but I am living my normal life! I consider myself blessed. Thank you for your work! I just purchased your book from Amazon.

Regarding oral toradol, we cannot find injectables or troche so my doctor prescribed Toradol® 10mg on Mondays and Thursday. I have tolerated it well.

I noticed the books says to avoid oral Toradol®, can you help me understand why?

Sincerely, K

ANSWER

Dear K,

We have recommended, on a broad scale, that oral ketorolac (Toradol®) not be used. Unfortunately, there are many people with gastrointestinal and kidney diseases, particularly in persons over 70 years of age. We have, therefore, been hesitant to recommend that oral ketorolac be used. On the other hand, many persons who have no kidney or gastrointestinal issues can safely take oral ketorolac. We highly recommend that oral ketorolac be taken with food and/or an antacid. Any vomitus of blood or stools that are black (from internal bleeding) are cause to stop oral ketorolac. We also don’t recommend any form of ketorolac be taken over 3 days a week with at least one day in between days that no ketorolac is taken. I’m delighted you have found a way to take ketorolac. Until a better suppressor of neuroinflammation comes along I think every person with AA should take at least one dose a week. Better yet, 1 to 3 times a week. We recommend a quarterly hemoglobin and creatinine to monitor for complications. The anti-inflammatory oral agents, diclofenac and indomethacin, are effective in some persons with AA, and they can be used on some days that ketorolac is not used.

In summary, ketorolac is almost an essential drug to control the inflammatory-adhesive mass that is inside the spinal canal. We have, consequently, modified our earlier ban on oral ketorolac.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

Dr. Tennant,

I was at my PCP this morning and diagnosed with Shingles… from what I’m reading and what he said, it seems that there could be some causation between Arachnoiditis and Shingles.

Have you found anything like this in your work? A

ANSWER

Dear A,

The relationship between AA and shingles is most intriguing. It may be that the herpes virus which causes shingles can also cause AA. In fact, it is probably possible that about any virus, bacteria or fungus that enters the spinal fluid can cause AA. Herpes causes shingles by invading nerves and producing inflammation. This virus may, therefore, invade cauda equina nerve roots and produce inflammation.

I now recommend the herpes vaccine to persons with AA when I formerly did not. Check with your primary care MD and he will tell you when and if you should have the vaccine. Let him know of my recommendation.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

Dear Dr. Tennant,

My Dr has been very responsive. A radiologist confirmed my AA but said he didn’t see a leak. My Dr. was wondering at what levels and at what stage he thinks I am at.
I am forever grateful for your work. I have a friend in my small town that reached out to me because my symptoms sound like hers. And look. I finally got diagnosed! And confirmation!

Light and Love, NH

ANSWER

Dear NH,

Some MRI’s show great scarring of cauda equina nerve roots but the person with AA doesn’t have much or any impairment of their arms or legs. On the other hand, some persons with few MRI abnormalities have severe neurologic impairments.

In summary the MRI may not correlate well with a person’s symptoms and impairments.

We categorize AA as: mild, moderate, severe, and catastrophic. Here are our criteria for each group. Look it over. Make your determination and share it with family and physicians.

Mild:
 Full range of extension and use of arms and legs
 No back indentation or contracture
 Normal inflammatory markers
 No bladder impairment
 No MRI evidence of spinal fluid leakage or obstruction
 No hormone abnormalities
 Can sit and stand in one position for 10 minutes

Moderate:
 Full range of extension and use of arms and legs
 Mild to zero lower extremity weakness but can walk without assistance
 Normal inflammatory markers
 Some bladder hesitancy, urgency, or dripping
 No MRI or physical evidence of spinal fluid leakage
 Mild constant pain but no need for sleep medication
 Can sit and stand in one position for 10 minutes

Severe:
 Some range of motion impairment and needs assistance (cane or other) to ambulate
 Weakness in lower extremities with neurologic symptoms (e.g. burning feet, bugs crawling, jerking or other)
 Elevated inflammatory markers and/or hormone abnormalities
 Bladder impairment symptoms of hesitancy, urgency, or incontinence
 MRI and/or physical evidence of chronic spinal fluid leakage and/or flow obstruction
 Constant pain that impairs sleep
 Can’t sit and stand in one position for 10 minutes

Catastrophic:
 Requires assistance with activities of daily living (dressing, toiletry, eating, etc.)
 Significant lower extremity impairment (needs walker, wheelchair, braces)
 Bladder impairment of hesitancy, urgency, or incontinence
 Mental deficiencies such as memory loss or reading ability
 MRI and physical evidence of chronic spinal fluid obstruction and leakage
 Elevated inflammatory markers and hormone abnormalities
 Constant pain that impairs sleep
 Can’t sit or stand in one position for 10 minutes

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

Dear Dr. Tennant,

Hi. I believe I have cervical Arachnoiditis. I came across a picture in a pain group that looks exactly how and what I feel and have all the indications from what I have read so far. This has been very difficult to describe to doctors. In fact, I am having trouble finding a doctor or specialist to help me.

I had my first severe pain episode after an injection years ago to treat severe stenosis at c5-c6. Since then I have had surgery to remove the bone spur, but the pain is always present but in a different form than it was before. And I have extreme pain flares on a regular basis. Physically I don’t do too much anymore, and I am scared to. Currently I am trying to manage my own pain and treatment based on your handbook, (Thank you so much!!) but I struggle.

Thank you, HS

ANSWER

Dear HS,

Cervical arachnoiditis (CA) is barely described in the medical and scientific literature. I have a keen interest in it, because I believe the pain of CA is usually worse than lumbar-sacral arachnoiditis.

Our recommended criteria for a clinical diagnosis of CA is the following:

1. severe pain worse on bending neck either forward or backward (backward most common)
2. an inciting, traumatic event such as an accident or surgery
3. weakness or other neurological abnormality in one or both arms/hands
4. MRI shows obstruction of spinal fluid flow

We recommend the same 3-component medication protocol as for lumbar-sacral AA: (1) suppression of neuroinflammation, (2) promotion of neuroregeneration, and (3) symptomatic pain control.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

Dr. Tennant,

I am on Tramadol, Ativan, low dose naltrexone (LDN) and I need to be on PEA and Turmeric. Not all but I plan to. I wanted to get on DHEA. I did take the 6-day steroid Pac a couple of times. I am working on LDN, but it’s hard to take because I think it causes confusion if I take it in the morning. I wake up in the middle of the night.

Thank you, PS

ANSWER

Dear PS,

If LDN makes you confused, lower your dose or take it only on some days of the week. Also, why don’t you try taking PEA, corydalis, boswellia, or taurine at the same time as your tramadol dose. There are some new reports that the simultaneous administration of these agents with tramadol boosts their pain-relieving effects. Keep in mind that Tramadol is a weak opioid and the use of it on the same day as LDN could possibly cause confusion.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

To Whom It May Concern,

I live in Tennessee. I have adhesive arachnoiditis. I recently started having severe bouts of vertigo that sometimes last the entire day. I also have started having a lot more pain in my neck area. I am still working but it is getting where I am having to stand at my desk because of the neck issue which makes it hard with the dizzy factor. Can arachnoiditis cause you to be dizzy? I haven’t started any new medications. If so, do you have any recommendations for this? I would greatly appreciate any information you could give me.

Thanks so much! LH

ANSWER

Dear LH,

The symptoms you describe are usually due to spinal fluid flow obstruction. Unfortunately, it may mean that you are inadequately suppressing neuroinflammation and that there is a space-occupying, inflammatory adhesive mass inside your spinal canal. You will want to try the drug acetazolamide (Diamox®) as it helps reduce spinal fluid flow symptoms in about 1/2 the cases. It lowers spinal fluid pressure and simultaneously suppresses neuroinflammation. Review your current program. My guess is that you are not fully participating in all 3 medical treatment components: (1) neuroinflammation suppression; (2) neuroregeneration, and (3) pain control. Also, you must daily do physiologic measures to enhance spinal fluid flow (walking, soaking, stretching, magnet rub, rocking).

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPH

Hello!

I have tried the emergency protocol for AA, and it was extremely helpful. Now I am trying to figure out what to do next.

I have a primary Doctor who is willing to help but somewhat skeptical of the protocol and how to administer it.

I also have read the document and see the many different supplements you recommend. I would like help in deciding which ones are best for me.

Just as an aside: I did do an HCG diet about 7 years ago and I have never felt (or looked!) better.

Please advise on what next steps I should take. I live in KY.

Thank you very much, RD

ANSWER

Dear RD,

Once you are finished with the emergency protocol you should start methylprednisolone, 2 to 4 mg on 3 to 5 days a week. Ketorolac should be taken 1 to 3 times a week.

HCG is perhaps the best hormone for AA since its intrinsic, base function is to grow nerve tissue and raise the levels of progesterone, estradiol, and testosterone.

In our research the AA patients who have done the best have taken HCG, ketorolac, and methylprednisolone along with symptomatic pain control drugs for an extended period. None of these agents need to be taken daily.

It is critical to also start some daily physiologic measures to enhance spinal fluid flow, reduce retained electricity, and maintain full function of your arms and legs. Basic measures include walking, arm swings, deep breathing, water soaking, rocking in a chair, and magnet rubs. If a medical practitioner is leery of methylprednisolone, use it only 1 to 2 days a week. If leery of ketorolac, try diclofenac or indomethacin.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPh

Dr. Tennant,

I was a police officer and suffered a spinal injury at age 26, I’m 73 now and have suffered with AA for over 50 years. I’ve been following Dr. Tennant’s supplement prescriptions for over 10 years. I have to say he and his medical tips have been a life saver. Those supps have kept me sane!

But I’m fading. I had my 8th lumber surgery 2 weeks back but the leg and foot pain from AA has always been worse. It is more difficult to treat than the injuries I received that brought on the Arachnoiditis.

Please convey my gratitude and deepest respects to Dr. Tennant, he’s made so many lives so much better.

We love you! JC

ANSWER

Dear JC,

At this time, you will need to be on the 3-component medical protocol: (1) suppression of neuroinflammation, (2) promotion of neuroregeneration, and (3) pain control. Keep in mind that the AA patients who have done the best have taken ketorolac, Medrol®, and HCG in low intermittent dosages. I recently had an innovative person who couldn’t find any medical help. She devised a program of curcumin, boswellia, and Traumeel®. She takes this in combination 3 to 4 times a day. Her program makes scientific, good sense.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPh

Hello,

I just read your AA handbook and it was talking about adrenal insufficiency and AA. Can I please have more information. I was just in the hospital in May and July for a crisis. I almost died in May because we didn’t know what was wrong. They thought I was septic. My BP was 49/32 at one point. My heart rate was dropping, and they gave me so much fluid without checking my albumin levels that they flooded my lungs with fluids. July wasn’t as bad as I knew I had the insufficiency and they treated me right away in the ER.

We don’t know what is causing it. Right now, I have unspecified adrenal insufficiency, I have an ACTH stimulation test next week, but right now we don’t know what is causing it.

Thank you! AP

ANSWER

Dear AP,

It is not well known, but AA can cause adrenal insufficiency. In fact, some of Dr. Addison’s (discovered adrenal insufficiency) cases in 1855 had AA. I’m glad that you survived as there are patients with AA who have died of adrenal insufficiency. After death, the person who died was sometimes erroneously accused of ‘overdose”. I hope you are taking cortisol replacement as you do need it. If you are not aware, whole adrenal and gonadal extracts can be purchased without a prescription over the internet or in most health food stores. Just today a nurse with severe AA told me that the Klaire adrenal extract of 250 mg gave her great relief after 2 weeks. Persons with AA should generally take about twice the recommended dosage on the label. Just to be safe, all persons with AA should consider non-prescription adrenal extract.

Naturally you will need vigorous 3-component: (1) suppression of neuroinflammation; (2) promotion of neuroregeneration, and (3) pain control medical treatment for your AA.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPh

Hello Dr. Tennant,

I just wanted to update you on my condition. The prednisone more consistently is helping, and I can think clearer more often. It also helps the pain. I am excited to try pregnenolone. I had not realized it was something I could buy over the counter. I have been reading many of your articles and (feel) like I have a clearer understanding of adhesive arachnoiditis, and how hormones may help.

Thank you, KR

ANSWER

Dear KR,

I’m delighted to hear that prednisone is helping. It isn’t as consistent as the other synthetic corticosteroids, methylprednisolone and dexamethasone, but it is more effective in some persons. I sometimes think prednisone acts more on the arachnoid-dura spinal canal covering than the attached nerve roots. You are very wise to start pregnenolone. The dosage is 200 to 300 mg a day. It can be taken 3 to 7 days a week. Some persons with AA believe it works best when the entire 200 to 300 mg is taken at one time. Pregnenolone, by itself, reduces neuroinflammation and promotes neuroregeneration. Also, it converts to progesterone inside the spinal canal, and progesterone is a powerful suppressor of neuroinflammation and promotes neuroregeneration. We highly recommend that all persons with AA give pregnenolone a try. Start at 50 mg a day and work up the dose every day until 200 mg is reached.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPh

Good evening Dr. Tennant,

I began following the 3-component protocol after being diagnosed with AA.

At the time I emailed you (about 1.5 months ago), I had nonstop back pain, a pulling sensation from lumbar area, leg pain, and tingling feet. I wasn’t even able to sleep anymore because of the pain. Currently, I only have intermittent back pain and the pulling sensation. The back pain and the other symptoms have greatly improved! I am now able to sleep on my back again and walk without so much pain. I’m also doing gentle stretches three times a day.

I wanted to ask you if there are any other things that you recommend, I take or do? I really appreciate the time you have taken to diagnose and give your recommendations.

Thank you so much for your help, MS

ANSWER

Dear M,

It’s no wonder you are improving since you are using the common sense, 3-component medical protocol. Besides medication, persons with AA need to do some daily physiologic measures to enhance spinal fluid flow, reduce retained electricity, and maintain arm and leg function. Included in these measures are walking, water soaking, arm swinging, deep breathing, magnet rubs, and stretching.

Please send my compliments to your physicians. After about 4 to 6 months you may wish to stop HCG and substitute nandrolone or medroxyprogesterone. The idea is to maximize anabolism (tissue growth) and neuroregeneration. There is no reason you can’t go for a cure or near cure. It may take a while, but the 3-component protocol has great flexibility and potential.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPh

Dear Dr. Tennant,

I seem to fit into the “mild” category of AA. I started your protocol 1 month ago, but I have not seen a difference. I am taking methylprednisolone, Toradol® injections, curcumin, serrapeptase. I have recently added PeaCure, pregnenolone, colostrum, and Vitamin E.
I’m not sure if my pain is coming from AA or a retethered cord.

Thank you for your help, M

ANSWER

Dear M,

If you have not noticed a difference within 8 weeks after starting methylprednisolone and Toradol®, you can assume you either do not have AA or you have previously had AA and that the inflammation is no longer active. I recommend that any medication that doesn’t seem to help after 8 weeks be stopped.

AA is caused by inflammation that merges or “glues” the cauda equina nerve roots to the arachnoid-dura covering of the spinal canal. An inflammatory-adhesive mass is formed inside the spinal canal that both impairs nerve function and may destroy some nerve tissue causing great pain. The inflammation may “burn out” leaving behind damaged nerve roots, intractable pain, and neurological impairments such as a poor functioning bladder or lower leg paralysis. When this occurs, anti-inflammatory medication such as corticosteroids will have no effect. Since AA is an inflammatory-adhesive mass that can permanently destroy nerve tissue, early and aggressive 3-component medical treatment is highly recommended to prevent serious complications.

Best wishes always,
Forest Tennant MD, DrPh